Dvd Sales Statistics

DVD SALES STATISTICS – std statistics uk.

Dvd Sales Statistics

    statistics

  • a branch of applied mathematics concerned with the collection and interpretation of quantitative data and the use of probability theory to estimate population parameters
  • (statistical) of or relating to statistics; “statistical population”
  • The practice or science of collecting and analyzing numerical data in large quantities, esp. for the purpose of inferring proportions in a whole from those in a representative sample
  • Denver Dalley is an accomplished singer-songwriter who got his start in Omaha, Nebraska.

    sales

  • The exchange of a commodity for money; the action of selling something
  • (sale) a particular instance of selling; “he has just made his first sale”; “they had to complete the sale before the banks closed”
  • (sale) the general activity of selling; “they tried to boost sales”; “laws limit the sale of handguns”
  • The activity or business of selling products
  • A quantity or amount sold
  • gross sales: income (at invoice values) received for goods and services over some given period of time

    dvd

  • videodisk: a digital recording (as of a movie) on an optical disk that can be played on a computer or a television set
  • DVD, also known as Digital Video Disc or Digital Versatile Disc, is an optical disc storage media format, and was invented and developed by Philips, Sony, Toshiba, and Time Warner in 1995. Its main uses are video and data storage.
  • A type of compact disc able to store large amounts of data, esp. high-resolution audio-visual material
  • The DVD is a Napalm Death DVD released by Earache in 2001. The only material seeing release for the first time is the Nottingham show from 1989 and the Killburn National show from 1989. The version of Utopia Banished currently in print features The DVD as a bonus disc.

dvd sales statistics

dvd sales statistics – Standing Ovation:

Standing Ovation: The Greatest Songs From The Stage
Standing Ovation: The Greatest Songs From The Stage
Standing Ovation sees singing sensation Susan Boyle and world acclaimed producer Biff Stannard join forces to present a stunning album of songs from the golden era of film and stage.

Featuring breathtaking renditions of ‘Send in the Clowns’ and ‘Bring Him Home’, Susan fearlessly takes on the iconic song ‘Somewhere Over The Rainbow’ giving it a new identity. ‘Standing Ovation’ also showcases duets with her lifelong idol Donny Osmond and the “Phantom” himself Michael Crawford. One of the selections, “Memory” from the musical Cats, will be familiar to her fans it’s the song Susan sang in the semi-final round of Britain’s Got Talent in 2009.

The album heralds a return to an era of much loved music for Susan Boyle, a lifelong fan of musicals. Her favorite songs from the golden age of film and theatre fused with her outstanding vocals from the ethereal to the dramatic, the music showcases the voice the world fell in love with.

Talking about her album Susan said; “I have been a fan of musicals since I was a wee girl. I love them and have enjoyed the drama and the range of emotions they inspire in you. I still remember the first time I saw Les Mis, my all time favorite. I fell in love with it and have seen it now countless times as each time you watch it you draw something different.
Creating this album was a joy and came very naturally as I knew the songs and could identify with the characters in the studio. Recording with Donny on two songs was a dream come true. Working with him was awesome and I learned so much from him as a performer and a person. Being in the studio with him was without doubt the best day ever- it wasn’t work!”

Standing Ovation was produced by Biff Stannard in Glasgow and London. Stannard is a highly regarded producer who in the past has worked with Kylie Minogue, U2, Westlife and One Direction to name a few.

Statistics

Statistics
So this is something I put together in Excel, and converted to Jpeg in PS. I then composited the two graphs in Picasa.

Basicly, I am just trying to express my total frustration with trying to understand statistics.

So anyhow like this if you like it, don’t if not. This is not my usual type work, but I had to express myself!

statistics

statistics
this tree is in front of the Stat. Building. i wonder if anyone ever wonders about the statistics of falling leaves and colors as they sit inside?

dvd sales statistics

Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game
“One of the best baseball—and management—books out….Deserves a place in the Baseball Hall of Fame.”—Forbes
Moneyball is a quest for the secret of success in baseball. Following the low-budget Oakland Athletics, their larger-than-life general manger, Billy Beane, and the strange brotherhood of amateur baseball enthusiasts, Michael Lewis has written not only “the single most influential baseball book ever” (Rob Neyer, Slate) but also what “may be the best book ever written on business” (Weekly Standard).

I wrote this book because I fell in love with a story. The story concerned a small group of undervalued professional baseball players and executives, many of whom had been rejected as unfit for the big leagues, who had turned themselves into one of the most successful franchises in Major League Baseball. But the idea for the book came well before I had good reason to write it—before I had a story to fall in love with. It began, really, with an innocent question: how did one of the poorest teams in baseball, the Oakland Athletics, win so many games?

With these words Michael Lewis launches us into the funniest, smartest, and most contrarian book since, well, since Liar’s Poker. Moneyball is a quest for something as elusive as the Holy Grail, something that money apparently can’t buy: the secret of success in baseball. The logical places to look would be the front offices of major league teams, and the dugouts, perhaps even in the minds of the players themselves. Lewis mines all these possibilities—his intimate and original portraits of big league ballplayers are alone worth the price of admission—but the real jackpot is a cache of numbers—numbers!—collected over the years by a strange brotherhood of amateur baseball enthusiasts: software engineers, statisticians, Wall Street analysts, lawyers and physics professors.

What these geek numbers show—no, prove—is that the traditional yardsticks of success for players and teams are fatally flawed. Even the box score misleads us by ignoring the crucial importance of the humble base-on-balls. This information has been around for years, and nobody inside Major League Baseball paid it any mind. And then came Billy Beane, General Manager of the Oakland Athletics.

Billy paid attention to those numbers —with the second lowest payroll in baseball at his disposal he had to—and this book records his astonishing experiment in finding and fielding a team that nobody else wanted. Moneyball is a roller coaster ride: before the 2002 season opens, Oakland must relinquish its three most prominent (and expensive) players, is written off by just about everyone, and then comes roaring back to challenge the American League record for consecutive wins.

In a narrative full of fabulous characters and brilliant excursions into the unexpected, Michael Lewis shows us how and why the new baseball knowledge works. He also sets up a sly and hilarious morality tale: Big Money, like Goliath, is always supposed to win…how can we not cheer for David?

Billy Beane, general manager of MLB’s Oakland A’s and protagonist of Michael Lewis’s Moneyball, had a problem: how to win in the Major Leagues with a budget that’s smaller than that of nearly every other team. Conventional wisdom long held that big name, highly athletic hitters and young pitchers with rocket arms were the ticket to success. But Beane and his staff, buoyed by massive amounts of carefully interpreted statistical data, believed that wins could be had by more affordable methods such as hitters with high on-base percentage and pitchers who get lots of ground outs. Given this information and a tight budget, Beane defied tradition and his own scouting department to build winning teams of young affordable players and inexpensive castoff veterans.
Lewis was in the room with the A’s top management as they spent the summer of 2002 adding and subtracting players and he provides outstanding play-by-play. In the June player draft, Beane acquired nearly every prospect he coveted (few of whom were coveted by other teams) and at the July trading deadline he engaged in a tense battle of nerves to acquire a lefty reliever. Besides being one of the most insider accounts ever written about baseball, Moneyball is populated with fascinating characters. We meet Jeremy Brown, an overweight college catcher who most teams project to be a 15th round draft pick (Beane takes him in the first). Sidearm pitcher Chad Bradford is plucked from the White Sox triple-A club to be a key set-up man and catcher Scott Hatteberg is rebuilt as a first baseman. But the most interesting character is Beane himself. A speedy athletic can’t-miss prospect who somehow missed, Beane reinvents himself as a front-office guru, relying on players completely unlike, say, Billy Beane. Lewis, one of the top nonfiction writers of his era (Liar’s Poker, The New New Thing), offers highly accessible explanations of baseball stats and his roadmap of Beane’s economic approach makes Moneyball an appealing reading experience for business people and sports fans alike. –John Moe